Leak Detection Archive


Commercial Water Main Leak Detection Survey in Norwalk, CT

posted Jan 10, 2017, 12:04 PM by Pete Viola   [ updated Feb 8, 2017, 6:50 PM ]

Avalon Bay, 1 Norden Pl., Norwalk, CTEarthmovers, Inc. of Danbury, CT, contacted us to perform a leak detection survey of a recently installed commercial water main at Avalon Bay, 10 Norden Pl., Norwalk, CT. Before conducting the leak detection survey, we marked the location and depth of the water line and determined it runs a distance of 1,000 feet. We then used this information to perform an acoustic correlating logger survey of the line. Unfortunately, this first attempt failed. After looking for reasons why this survey failed and discussing the issue with the on-site Superintendent, it was brought to our attention that the pressure of the line was less than 65 psi--a pressure that was simply too low for acoustics to be effective. We requested the pressure be increased before making another attempt. This could not be done immediately, so we scheduled to come back the next day when a facilities person would on site to turn up the water pressure for us. The next day, after the facilities person turned up the pressure as high as the system could withstand, a second acoustic correlating logger survey was performed. The results of this second survey were much better than the first one. In fact, it enabled us to easily find and pinpoint the exact location of the water leak. The location of the leak was marked on the ground with pink paint. Earthmovers immediately began excavation to expose the broken pipe for repair. Soon after, the leak was found right underneath our ground markings, enabling them to see exactly what was wrong with the line. As it turned out, a manufacturing defect in the pipe joint was the cause of the leak. This was a key piece of information. Rather than Earthmovers being responsible for paying for the repair of the broken pipe, they were able to get funding from the manufacturer to pay for a new joint and the labor required to install it--saving them from this unexpected expense. As one can see from the photos below, the defect was a very small pin-sized hole in the joint; and, as one can see from the two sounding graphs, the leak was easy to spot.


Slideshow



Sounding #1



Sounding #2



To learn more about our leak detection services, please visit the underground water line leak detection services page.

Residential Water Line Leak Detection Survey in Montrose, NY

posted Jan 10, 2017, 10:07 AM by Pete Viola   [ updated Feb 8, 2017, 3:09 PM ]

Kings Ferry Rd., Montrose, NYAfter having already cancelled a leak detection survey once and debating whether it was necessary or not, a client of Pizzella Brothers, Inc. finally contacted John Pizzella to give him authorization to find and repair a residential water line on their property at Kings Ferry Rd., Montrose, NY. To do so, John scheduled us to perform a residential water leak detection survey. The survey was performed using acoustic correlator technology by putting one correlating logger on the line where it exits the basement and another on the line at the water shut off valve near the street. The results were excellent, enabling us to find the water leak. As shown in the photos below, the location of the leak was marked on the ground with pink paint and a flag. This enabled John to dig right at that spot so that he can expose the pipe for repair. In fact, he called back just a few days later to let us know the leak was just 6 inches away from our ground markings. Subsurface conditions sometimes make it difficult to pinpoint the exact location of the leak. However, as was proved in this case, getting near the leak was enough to help John dig his way over to the exact leak location. As John can attest to, this was much better than digging up the entire yard.


Slideshow


To learn more about our leak detection services, please visit the underground water line leak detection services page.

Steam Line Leak Detection Using Helium Tracer Gas in Norwich, CT

posted Jan 6, 2017, 3:03 PM by Pete Viola   [ updated Feb 8, 2017, 3:11 PM ]

York Correctional Institution, Niantic, CTIt is quite common in the media today to hear people talk about there being a great divide between public and private institutions, including the people who work for them, yet this project is proof that such a belief is utterly false. The late Ken White (may he rest in peace) was a state employee who was in charge of maintaining the aging infrastructure at York Correctional Institution, Niantic, CT. Since the Great Recession, the amount of funding he received for maintenance had continually dropped year after year, forcing him and his team to come up with innovative ways of maintaining and repairing infrastructure around the facility. One of the biggest problems faced by the maintenance staff was keeping the aging heating and cooling system up and running, especially during hot summers and cold winters. Despite all the innovative solutions they had come up with over the years, by 2012 there were so many leaks in this system they had no choice but to take immediate action and do some repairs.

Having utilized our utility locating services since 2010, Ken contacted us to see if we could help him find leaks in the heating and cooling system. Using acoustic ground microphone and acoustic correlating logger technology--the only two leak detection technologies we utilized at the time--we did our very best to find a leak. Unfortunately, though, these attempts were simply an exercise in futility. The lines were 10-12 feet deep and were composed of Polyvinyl chloride (PVC), so acoustic locating was not the right technology for this particular situation. Therefore, Ken hired another company to perform a leak detection survey using Helium gas detection technology.

Unfortunately for Ken, but fortunately for us, the company never showed up. As a result of being stood up by the other company, Ken was determined to either have his staff learn the Helium detection method themselves or to have us rent the equipment and give it a try ourselves. After hearing about the latter option, we jumped at the opportunity to rent the equipment and give it a go. In order to do this, however, we made a deal with Ken. We would supply the helium detector and compressor as long as he purchased the Helium gas; in addition, being that he had a whole maintenance staff at his disposal, we requested that his team help us set up the compressor to inject the Helium into the line.

After spending about 2-3 hours playing around with the Helium tank, compressor, and the gauges, we were finally able to get a steady flow of Helium into the line. Not having a damn clue what we were doing, we searched around impatiently for about an hour, thinking the entire process was merely another exercise in futility. However, just as it started to get dark, around 8:00 pm (it was a June day), the Helium detector began to produce a positive reading. We searched around excitingly for the next hour, trying to find where the maximum concentration of Helium was located. Finally, we found it, and marked its exact location on ground with pink paint. The next day, Ken and his staff dug right on top of the ground markings, and he reported back to us that the leak was right underneath the markings and they had already made the necessary repairs. He then proceeded to schedule another Helium detection survey. A new service was born!

Since this first Helium detection survey, we have been to the site numerous times to find many other leaks in the heating in cooling system. However, nothing will ever be as satisfying as this first survey was. Not only did we learn to use a new piece of technology and a new technique for locating difficult to find water leaks, but we also proved that public and private institutions are quite capable of working together for the common good. Below is a slideshow showing the setup that was used to pump Helium into the line that day, as well as the various numerical helium concentrations that were captured by the Helium detector. We apologize for the blurry photos, but this project was just too important not to post. Enjoy!


Slideshow



To learn more about our leak detection services, please visit the underground water line leak detection services page.

Finding a Leak in a Commercial Water Line in Peekskill, NY

posted Jan 6, 2017, 1:52 PM by Pete Viola   [ updated Feb 8, 2017, 3:12 PM ]

955 Washington St., Peekskill, NY Pizzella Brothers, Inc., needed us out quickly to find a leak in a commercial water line at 955 Washington St., Peekskill, NY. As usual, John made a special request to have Jay come out to perform the water leak detection survey for him. By using a combination of acoustic ground microphone and correlating logger technology, Jay was able to find the location of the underground water leak in a sloped grassy area midway between the building and the roadway. Once the location of the leak was marked on the ground with pink paint and flags, John was able to excavate down to the water line and make the necessary repairs.


Slideshow



To learn more about our leak detection services, please visit the underground water line leak detection services page.

Finding a Water Leak With Helium Gas Detection in Norwalk, CT

posted Jan 6, 2017, 11:09 AM by Pete Viola   [ updated May 22, 2017, 5:57 AM ]

All Saints Catholic School, Norwalk, CTEverton America of Wilton, CT, was given the difficult task of finding an underground water leak at All Saints Catholic School, Norwwalk, CT, in a water pipe that runs from the upper soccer field all the way down to the lower soccer field. Because of the long distance this line runs, and due to the fact they believed it is composed of different pipe materials, we decided to use Helium gas detection technology to find the leak. To begin the survey, we marked out the location and depth of the water line. Next, a large volume of Helium gas was pumped into the line, using an air compressor. Next, our technician walked along its path with the gas detector about three to four times. Finally, after about an hour of pumping Helium into the line, we found the leak at the base of the water fountain at the lower soccer field. The location of the leak was marked on the ground with pink paint, showing exactly where excavation needed to be performed to expose the pipe for repair. Everton America was then able to repair the pipe without any time consuming and costly exploratory digging.


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To learn more about our leak detection services, please visit the underground water line leak detection services page.

Finding a Leak in a Residential Water Line in Cortlandt Manor, NY

posted Jan 6, 2017, 8:52 AM by Pete Viola   [ updated Feb 8, 2017, 3:15 PM ]

Woodybrook Ln., Cortlandt Manor, NY Pizzella Brothers, Inc. of Cortlandt Manor, NY, was hired by a homeowner in their town to repair a leaking copper water service line. Before doing the repair, however, it was necessary to determine the location of the water leak. The homeowner was in contact with another leak detection company and was ready to use their services when, all of a sudden, John Pizzella stepped in and convinced them they should use our Level 1 leak detection services instead. After convincing his client we were the right company for the job, he gave us the notice to proceed. Upon arrival on site, we marked the location and depth of the water line from the curb box to the house and calculated its exact distance at 361 feet. Knowing the exact distance of the line then enabled us to conduct a  ZCorr digital correlating logger survey. We ran four separate ZCorr soundings. Each one showed that the leak was located about half way down the driveway. The location of the leak was marked on the ground with pink paint to show exactly where excavation needed to be performed to repair the broken water line. Soon after, John Pizzella dug in that exact spot, found the leak, and made the repair. As a result, his client finally had a properly functioning water line and they were glad to have listened to his advice on using our services.


Slideshow



Sounding #1



Sounding #2



Sounding #3



Sounding #4



To learn more about our leak detection services, please visit the underground water line leak detection services page.

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